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    Monday
    Apr282014

    April 28 is National Blueberry Pie Day

    (Photo: AL.com)

    Interesting Food Facts about Blueberry   

    Blueberries are one of the only natural foods that are truly blue in color.  The pale, powder-like protective coating on the skin of blueberries is called "bloom."  A blueberry extract diet improves balance, coordination, and short-term memory in aging rats.  Blueberries are the official berries of Nova Scotia, Canada.  The anthocyanin present in blueberries is good for eyesight.

    Fun Fact:

    The U.S. is the world’s largest producer of blueberries, harvesting a total of 564.4 million pounds of cultivated and wild blueberries in 2012.  

    Blueberries can be harvested by gently shaking a bush and catching the falling berries.

    Blueberries don’t ripen after they have been picked.

    Tuesday
    Apr222014

    Give Your Memory a Boost With Blueberry Juice

    Blueberry Juice
    (Photo:dailytimes.com)

    Researchers have reported that blueberries improve memory. The research establishes a foundation for extensive human clinical studies to determine if blueberries truly are worthy of their increasing reputation as a memory booster.

    The scientists explain that earlier research in lab animals indicate that consuming blueberries could help boost memory in the elderly. Up to now, however, there was very little scientific work directed at testing how blueberry supplementation affects memory in humans.

    For the study, 1 group of individuals in their 70s having early memory decline consumed roughly the same as 2 to 2 l/2 cups of a commercially obtainable blueberry juice each day for 2 months. The control group consumed a beverage with no blueberry juice. The blueberry juice group demonstrated major improvement on learning and memory tests.

    These initial memory results are encouraging and indicate that regular blueberry supplementation could offer an approach to delay or minimize neurodegeneration.

    Source

    Sunday
    Apr202014

    We Wish You And Your Family A Happy Easter

    Thursday
    Apr172014

    Farm to Fork: Blueberries for dinner

    Filled with fiber and heart-helping antioxidants, blueberries are one of the original superfoods.

    Sure, blueberries are beautiful in pancakes, muffins, pies and tarts. But how do you incorporate these jewels into your dinner? Salsas, salads and sauces are a few techniques. This grain and vegetable salad is sweetened with blueberries, elevating a good salad to great.

    Vegetable Couscous with Blueberries

    4 servings

    1 cup vegetable stock
    3 tablespoons olive oil
    1 cup couscous
    1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
    Pinch ground cumin
    2 carrots, diced
    1 small zucchini, diced
    ¼ cup walnut halves, chopped
    cups fresh or frozen blueberries
    ½ cup cooked (canned) chickpeas
    Salt and pepper to taste
    4 sprigs each fresh coriander and flat leaf parsley, chopped

     

    In small saucepan, bring vegetable stock and 2 tbsp of the oil to boil. Add couscous, lemon rind and cumin; stir to combine. Remove from heat and cover; let stand for 5 minutes. Fluff with fork and scrape into large bowl.

    Meanwhile, heat remaining oil in skillet over medium heat and cook carrots for 5 minutes or until becoming softened. Add zucchini and cook for 3 minutes or until softened. Remove from heat and add walnuts. Add to couscous. Add wild blueberries and chickpeas to bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add coriander and parsley and stir to combine well.

    Source: Adapted from the Wild Blueberry Association of North America, as seen on houseandhome.com

    GetContent[1]

    (Photo: Amy Sowder/The News-Press)

    Vegetable couscous with blueberries makes an easy and filling main course or side dish with the chickpea protein, Israeli pearl couscous, nuts, vegetables and fruit. 

     Source

    Monday
    Apr142014

    Blueberries help reduce Parkinson’s risk

    A new study shows eating blueberries reduces the risk of contracting Parkinson’s disease and may protect human brain performance.

    A group of scientists from North Carolina State University, Purdue University and Rutgers University investigated how extracts from blueberries, grape seeds, hibiscus, blackcurrant and Chinese mulberries, all of which are rich in health-promoting phytochemicals, could suppress cell death caused by Parkinson’s, according to a news release.

    The study, “Neuroprotective effects of anthocyanin- and proanthocyanidin-rich extracts in cellular models of Parkinson’s disease,” was published in the March 25 issue of the Brain Research scientific journal.

    Findings indicate two specific classes of phytochemicals are effective against the neurodegeneration or loss of nerve cell function in the brain brought on by Parkinson’s, according to the release.

    Anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins are naturally occurring plant compounds prevalent in some fruits and vegetables.

    “Blueberries have both of these natural chemicals in high concentrations, so they pack a more powerful, 1-2 punch,” researcher Mary Ann Lila, director of North Carolina State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute in Kannapolis, N.C., said in the release. “They can have synergistic benefits that surpass many other fruits when it comes to protection against brain cell death, which in turn may reduce the risk of contracting Parkinson’s.”

    In the U.S., 1 million people are estimated to suffer from Parkinson’s, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that involves the malfunction and death of vital brain nerve cells. The disease leaves people unable to control movement normally.

    Source

    A new study shows eating blueberries reduces the risk of contracting Parkinson’s disease and may protect human brain performance.

    A group of scientists from North Carolina State University, Purdue University and Rutgers University investigated how extracts from blueberries, grape seeds, hibiscus, blackcurrant and Chinese mulberries, all of which are rich in health-promoting phytochemicals, could suppress cell death caused by Parkinson’s, according to a news release.

    The study, “Neuroprotective effects of anthocyanin- and proanthocyanidin-rich extracts in cellular models of Parkinson’s disease,” was published in the March 25 issue of the Brain Research scientific journal, http://bit.ly/1e8v1Ml.

    Findings indicate two specific classes of phytochemicals are effective against the neurodegeneration or loss of nerve cell function in the brain brought on by Parkinson’s, according to the release.

    Anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins are naturally occurring plant compounds prevalent in some fruits and vegetables.

    “Blueberries have both of these natural chemicals in high concentrations, so they pack a more powerful, 1-2 punch,” researcher Mary Ann Lila, director of North Carolina State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute in Kannapolis, N.C., said in the release. “They can have synergistic benefits that surpass many other fruits when it comes to protection against brain cell death, which in turn may reduce the risk of contracting Parkinson’s.”

    In the U.S., 1 million people are estimated to suffer from Parkinson’s, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that involves the malfunction and death of vital brain nerve cells. The disease leaves people unable to control movement normally.

    - See more at: http://www.thepacker.com/fruit-vegetable-news/Study-blueberries-help-reduce-Parkinsons-risk-254594811.html#sthash.Qs0S4Qq1.dpuf